Meet the Hendl Family

Matt Hendl served his nation in the United States Navy, reaching the rank of E-8 (Senior Chief Petty Officer). Matt’s service included significant time in a nuclear submarine. In fact, out of the 20 years Hendl served his country, seven of those years were under water ensuring our nation’s safety. 

Matt was not alone in his service, supporting him was his wife Emely and their daughter, Annika. The family has been all over the world due to Matt’s various deployments. Emely juggled the life of military mom with her career as Transportation Assistant, coordinating moves for all military personnel for the Navy in England and Washington State.

Graze Master Chickens

The Kosher King (Silver Cross) is a type of free-range broiler or meat chicken. They have a more natural growth rate and are vigorous and healthy foragers, perfect for natural or organic farms and worthy of the Graze Master name. The Kosher Kings originated from a mix of heritage breeds, including Barred Rocks and Sussex Chickens. During the day, the chickens free-range on the Ficke farm in a controlled manner, much like Del’s cattle. They feed on the various insects, grasses and nutrients that the land provides for them.

      


“We simply want our community to know the people and practices behind their food. We are honored to work with Del Ficke and his family to provide agri-tourism opportunities and great chicken to compliment his already great beef at Ficke Cattle Company – Graze Master Genetics®.” 
                                                                                             -- Matt Hendl


Household Woodworking Items

All materials used in my furniture items are locally sourced. A majority of the wooden material came from Del Ficke’s farm. I enjoy using reclaimed lumber because of the history in each piece. Some pieces were used to contain cattle or poultry that were raised to provide a meal for a local family. Other pieces of wood may have provided a home for people. Most of the wood used is a type of conifer (pine species) that was milled more than 50 years ago.  

The lumber used is also very different from today’s wood. The grain is very close together, meaning that it was allowed to grow at a slower rate. This results in greater strength and weight. It is no wonder that many of the old barns from the early 1900’s are still standing! 

“I am a dreamer and this is our dream. It’s much like what Gloria Steinem said, ‘Without leaps of imagination, or dreaming, we lose the excitement of possibilities. Dreaming, after all, is a form of planning.’” 
                                                                            --Emely Hendl


Cutting Boards & Cheese Boards 

Each cutting board is unique because they are made with multiple hardwood species. Each wood type varies by thickness and hardness (Janka rating). The species used in various boards are:
Hard Maple: Also known as “Sugar Maple” (The same trees that are tapped for maple syrup); it is twice as strong as Box Elder.
Mahogany: A great amount of the first-quality furniture made in the American colonies from the mid-18th centuries was made from this species of wood. It is often used in fine woodworking.
Sapele: Known as “African Mahogany” due to shortages in real Mahogany; it is mainly used in exotic musical instruments and ukuleles.  
Black Walnut: Very durable and easy to work with. It is used to make gunstocks, cabinetry, furniture and turned items.
Black Cherry: Extremely popular with cabinetmakers. Cherry is easy to work with, fine textured, strong and fairly durable. This wood becomes darker and richer with age.
Yellow Heart: A wood from Brazil that is known for its golden tone. It is not to be confused with Poplar or Pine. It is used in boatbuilding, furniture and accent pieces.


Annika Hendl is very excited too.  She has her own quote from a picture on her bedroom wall to share about their family’s dream coming true on the farm, “Ralph Waldo Emerson said, ‘To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else, that is greatest accomplishment.’”

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